Saturday, October 30, 2010

Saturday Morning Private lessons...and Radio City Christmas Spectacular


Saturday mornings have turned into a time when I teach private lessons. I love this time so much. I am at home, in my own space, working one-on-one with students who are seeking to discover more about dance in their own bodies. We deal with technique, choreography and self-expression. I especially enjoy the connect I get to have with these students. It is awakening to my soul and allows me to tap into my source and share.

I will add a special shout out to Nick Bazo, Manager of School Programs, Citi Performing Arts Center
who has taken me into the fold and will be including me in a 6 week residency in the Boston Public Schools in conjunction with Target. 

THE TARGET ARTS IN-SCHOOL THEATRE RESIDENCY PROGRAM 2010-2011: RADIO  CITY CHRISTMAS SPECTACULAR.
"The Target Arts program, now in its second year, is a unique city-wide collaboration among Boston’s fine arts, cultural, and municipal organizations. The program aims to improve school success, engage families, and strengthen community by giving access to Boston’s rich offerings of music, dance, visual arts, theater and cultural events to students and families who typically have no opportunity to engage in the professional performing arts. Arts and cultural enrichment celebrations will develop diverse audiences by bringing information to the community through school-based development, community outreach, and citywide collaboration. The BPS Arts Office in partnership with Citi Performing Arts Center coordinates Target Arts programming.This programming includes in-school residencies and special guest artist visits and an invitation to view professional performances at Citi Performing Arts Center and other Boston Theatre District venues."

These city schools are nearly devoid of art classes, so I want to give three cheers for Target and thank them for their generosity. Thank you also to Ms. Adrienne Hawkins for the great reference!

Ole Namaste!

Thursday, October 28, 2010

Fall Flamenco Festival 2010: Free ticket give away!

Be the first to answer the contest question correctly and you will win a pair of tickets to the Sunday 3PM show of Pepe Torres & Company!
QUESTION? What is the meaning of the word “gitaneria”?
Mail answer to Eve Agush at AdamAnt_Eve@hotmail.com

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_Ty55Ed2OdlE/TMnUXncQWpI/AAAAAAAAAOA/i9B-ozdsaSI/s640/image001.jpg

WORLD MUSIC/CRASHarts PRESENTS
Direct From Spain
FALL FLAMENCO FESTIVAL 2010: Gitano Roots of Flamenco
2 PROGRAMS
Featuring:
Angelita Vargas & Jairo Barrull
Performing the Boston premiere of Gitanerías
Friday, November 19, 8pm, Berklee Performance Center
-AND-
PEPE TORRES & cOMPANY
Performing the Boston premiere of Homenaje
Sunday, November 21, 3pm, Berklee Performance Center

Tickets:$50-$30
FOR MORE INFO OR TO BUY TICKETS ONLINE NOW!
Groups of 20 or more receive a 20% discount on tickets when purchasing tickets in advance with World Music. Call 617-876-4275 for details.
For tickets and information call World Music/CRASHarts at (617) 876-4275 or buy online at www.WorldMusic.org.

World Music/CRASHarts presents the Boston debut of an exciting new Fall Flamenco Festival direct from Spain, Gypsy Flamenco~Gitano Roots of Flamenco featuring Angelita Vargas and Jairo Barrull performing the Boston premiere of Gitanerías on Friday, November 19, 8pm and Pepe Torres and Company performing the Boston premiere of Homenaje on Sunday November 21, 3pm at the Berklee Performance Center, 136 Massachusetts Ave., Boston. Tickets for each performance are $50, $40 and $30. For tickets and information call World Music/CRASHarts at (617) 876-4275 or buy online at www.WorldMusic.org.

Direct from Spain, Fall Flamenco Festival 2010: Gypsy Flamenco~Gitano Roots of Flamenco captures all the passion, skill and excitement of Gypsy flamenco dance. Both programs will also feature an exceptional ensemble of traditional flamenco musicians, performing live on stage.

Direct from Seville, Gypsy flamenco dance icon Angelita Vargas and the young, dynamic Jairo Barrull join together for a mesmerizing night of Gypsy flamenco. Vargas swept Broadway in the 1980s with Flamenco Puro and was recently featured in a piece with the Farruco family that toured extensively to wide acclaim throughout Europe. Barrull, who is the great-grandnephew of legendary guitarist Diego del Gastor, has performed with such important figures as Concha Vargas and Juana Amaya. Gitanerías honors the passing down of flamenco traditions from generation to generation in the Gypsy community, where dance is an expression of cultural identity.

Dancer Pepe Torres is a polyrhythmic powerhouse whose superb footwork provided the main percussive support for the award-winning ensemble Son de la Frontera. Raised in Andalusia's Morón de la Frontera, a hotbed of Gypsy flamenco, he has toured extensively with Martirio, Antonio Canales, Sara Baras, Manuela Carrasco, Farruquito, Juana Amaya and many others. Torres comes to Boston with his own acclaimed company for the first time, performing Homenaje, a centennial tribute to his grandfather, legendary Gypsy flamenco singer Joselero de Moron, and a celebration of his family's unique contributions to the history of flamenco, which also includes his great-uncle, guitarist Diego del Gastor. Juan del Gastor will also appear as guest artist.

To download high resolution digital photos go to www.WorldMusic.org and click “PRESS CENTER”

About World Music/CRASHarts
World Music, a non-profit organization established in 1990, is New England’s premier presenter of global culture, featuring music and dance from the far and near corners of the globe. In 2001, World Music launched CRASHarts as a division of World Music dedicated to presenting a contemporary performing arts series in greater Boston. World Music/CRASHarts strives to offer audiences an opportunity to share in many different cultural and artistic expressions and seeks to foster an atmosphere of discovery and exploration. The organization presents approximately 70 concerts and 15 educational programs per year. For more information, call (617) 876-4275 or visit www.WorldMusic.org

World Music/CRASHarts is funded in part by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency which also receives support from the National Endowment for the Arts.

FALL FLAMENCO FESTIVAL 2010: Gitano Roots of Flamenco



WORLD MUSIC/CRASHarts PRESENTS
Direct From Spain
FALL FLAMENCO FESTIVAL 2010: Gitano Roots of Flamenco
2 PROGRAMS
Featuring:
Angelita Vargas & Jairo Barrull
Performing the Boston premiere of Gitanerías
Friday, November 19, 8pm, Berklee Performance Center
-AND-
PEPE TORRES & cOMPANY
Performing the Boston premiere of Homenaje
Sunday, November 21, 3pm, Berklee Performance Center

Tickets:$50-$30
FOR MORE INFO OR TO BUY TICKETS ONLINE NOW!
Groups of 20 or more receive a 20% discount on tickets when purchasing tickets in advance with World Music. Call 617-876-4275 for details.
For tickets and information call World Music/CRASHarts at (617) 876-4275 or buy online at www.WorldMusic.org.

World Music/CRASHarts presents the Boston debut of an exciting new Fall Flamenco Festival direct from Spain, Gypsy Flamenco~Gitano Roots of Flamenco featuring Angelita Vargas and Jairo Barrull performing the Boston premiere of Gitanerías on Friday, November 19, 8pm and Pepe Torres and Company performing the Boston premiere of Homenaje on Sunday November 21, 3pm at the Berklee Performance Center, 136 Massachusetts Ave., Boston. Tickets for each performance are $50, $40 and $30. For tickets and information call World Music/CRASHarts at (617) 876-4275 or buy online at www.WorldMusic.org.

Direct from Spain, Fall Flamenco Festival 2010: Gypsy Flamenco~Gitano Roots of Flamenco captures all the passion, skill and excitement of Gypsy flamenco dance. Both programs will also feature an exceptional ensemble of traditional flamenco musicians, performing live on stage.

Direct from Seville, Gypsy flamenco dance icon Angelita Vargas and the young, dynamic Jairo Barrull join together for a mesmerizing night of Gypsy flamenco. Vargas swept Broadway in the 1980s with Flamenco Puro and was recently featured in a piece with the Farruco family that toured extensively to wide acclaim throughout Europe. Barrull, who is the great-grandnephew of legendary guitarist Diego del Gastor, has performed with such important figures as Concha Vargas and Juana Amaya. Gitanerías honors the passing down of flamenco traditions from generation to generation in the Gypsy community, where dance is an expression of cultural identity.

Dancer Pepe Torres is a polyrhythmic powerhouse whose superb footwork provided the main percussive support for the award-winning ensemble Son de la Frontera. Raised in Andalusia's Morón de la Frontera, a hotbed of Gypsy flamenco, he has toured extensively with Martirio, Antonio Canales, Sara Baras, Manuela Carrasco, Farruquito, Juana Amaya and many others. Torres comes to Boston with his own acclaimed company for the first time, performing Homenaje, a centennial tribute to his grandfather, legendary Gypsy flamenco singer Joselero de Moron, and a celebration of his family's unique contributions to the history of flamenco, which also includes his great-uncle, guitarist Diego del Gastor. Juan del Gastor will also appear as guest artist.

To download high resolution digital photos go to www.WorldMusic.org and click “PRESS CENTER”

About World Music/CRASHarts
World Music, a non-profit organization established in 1990, is New England’s premier presenter of global culture, featuring music and dance from the far and near corners of the globe. In 2001, World Music launched CRASHarts as a division of World Music dedicated to presenting a contemporary performing arts series in greater Boston. World Music/CRASHarts strives to offer audiences an opportunity to share in many different cultural and artistic expressions and seeks to foster an atmosphere of discovery and exploration. The organization presents approximately 70 concerts and 15 educational programs per year. For more information, call (617) 876-4275 or visit www.WorldMusic.org

World Music/CRASHarts is funded in part by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency which also receives support from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Friday, October 22, 2010

World Music Presents Concha Buika

From Spain
BUIKA

 
“Extraordinary . . . a great artist.”—Miami Herald
Saturday, October 23, 8pm I $37, $32, $30
Berklee Performance Center, 136 Massachusetts Ave., Boston
For tickets, www.worldmusic.org

Tuesday, October 19, 2010

Yoga Retreatat Spirit Bear Power Yoga for Girls (ages 8-14)....Moms welcome too!


Yoga Retreat for Girls

(ages 8-14) ….and Moms too 

with Eve Agush at 

Spirit Bear Power Yoga


Saturday, November 13th:  7:00 – 9:00pm  
RELAX with an incredible stretch, like a giant yawn for the body. We will spend one hour practicing breathing techniques, restorative yoga poses and meditation. The second hour, we will explore journaling, healthier lifestyles and creation of personal mandalas.
Sunday, November 14th: 11:00am – 1:00pm 
Rise and Shine!  We will greet the sun with an energetic practice. Through warming poses, our bodies will breathe in new life and vitality. Students will learn poses, breath, and meditation that will help reduce and manage stress. Expect to leave feeling strong and balanced!

Register on-line or at the studio. Spirit Bear Power Yoga is located in Natick Center at 19 Main Street at the intersection of Route 27 and Route 135
1 student:  $20 for both, $15 single session
Mom:  $20 both, $15 single session
Second sibling:  $15 for both, $10 single session

(508)655-YOGA For more info

Monday, October 18, 2010

Young Audiences Fall 2010 Showcase Review: Second 1/2 of the day

10:25 found me back in the cafeteria for David Zucker: Poetry in Motion performing for 3rd grade. David made poetry seem part of the regular speech process. He spoke in a normal toned voice and seemingly just chatted with the kids-until they realized because of rhyming or a twist that he was actually reciting poetry. He walked casually around the floor where the kids were sitting in his bright red low top Converse sneakers-comfortably dressed in pants a vets and a t shirt. He wore some type of animal nose. He painted using his words and he painted a bright and beautiful picture for us all to see. He did a funny poem called That New Kid, which ended with a good humorous twist. He swiftly and easily changed his characters using a great engaging voice to draw the audience with him. He is childlike but not at all childish and fits in with his audience. He explained the form of a Haiku (5-7-5) and shot of a few. The audience was laughing and enjoying themselves, just listening and calling out responses-he did a rhyming call and response with them that had everyone laughing out loud. He recited a poem, using a baton as a prop, with Mozart in the background. He then changed the music to a more upbeat funky rhythm and then redid the poem in a more rap like style, giving it a whole new edge. I loved this show. It was so relaxing and educational and fun and funny! David Zucker gives great delivery!

A.A. Milne's poem called The Four Friends:
Ernest was an elephant, a great big fellow,
Leonard was a lion with a six foot tail,
George was a goat, and his beard was yellow,
And James was a very small snail.

Leonard had a stall, and a great big strong one,
Earnest had a manger, and its walls were thick,
George found a pen, but I think it was the wrong one,
And James sat down on a brick

Earnest started trumpeting, and cracked his manger,
Leonard started roaring, and shivered his stall,
James gave a huffle of a snail in danger
And nobody heard him at all.

Earnest started trumpeting and raised such a rumpus,
Leonard started roaring and trying to kick,
James went on a journey with the goats new compass
And he reached the end of his brick.

Ernest was an elephant and very well intentioned,
Leonard was a lion with a brave new tail,
George was a goat, as I think I have mentioned,
but James was only a snail. 


I then skittled back up room 117 and watched Mass Motion workshop: Social Dance and hip hop working with 4th graders. It was introduced by Mikki Taylor Pinney, the director and then the floor was taken over by two dance instructors. They explained that people dance for many reasons: cultural identity; sometimes we cannot express ourselves with words, so movement might be better; and sometimes we just dance for fun. They got all the kids up and had them move around the room. The space was not huge but the movements were not frantic and with easy directions and calm voices, they kept the kids using the space wisely. The kids were instructed to make any shape and freeze. Then they were instructed to a "high-level" sports shape, a "low-level" (on the floor) animal shape and then any shape in-between. They then added types of movement to the directions: move sharply, move swingy, move smoothly. And then they had them perform all of these at different levels of height (high, low, in-between). The kids moved around the room and were told to aim for open spaces, to try new levels on their own and then to try the swingy movement at the lowest level on the floor. The main teacher then had the kids focus and she began to teach a short African inspired dance routine. It was a Jimbe-which is a dance of the harvest. The steps were challenging but not too much for even the kids who were the least coordinated were still able after a few runs to be able to do all the steps. The kids were focused and were enjoying themselves and the teachers made the dance current and accessible. I am not sure if they also worked on a hip hop routine or just did the same dance to both African and hip hop music.

Close to 11:00, I caught the tail end of Mister G: Who Writes Songs? You Do! Performing for 3rd grade. Mister G is a solo act with a guitar and a mike. The audience was completely engaged with him. He had them singing and moving their hands, making rhymes (like swirl and whirl). He changed the music he was playing to change the style of the same song. He incorporated Spanish words into his song. I did not see enough of this act to comment more.

I was excited to see Jeff Davis: Massachusetts performing for 3rd grade and I was not disappointed. He was calm and soft spoken. He had the audience leaning in. I loved that he started by playing a Native flute and then spoke in the Native Massachusetts language spoken by the Wampanoag Indians. He asked the kids if they knew what language he was speaking and not one person knew, although they called out: French, Spanish, Italian, German, Russian...and oddly enough it did sound like all those languages. Around him, he had set up nice black and white pictures on music stands and he had a number of instruments (the Native Banjo was especially interesting in look and sound). He easily tied in a history lesson as he spoke about the Wampanoag Indians and the arrival of the English in 1620. He brought with him a mouth harp and four more examples of the same instrument from different cultures and decades. I absolutely loved this show and would love to see him come to my son's classroom. He has an extremely engaging way of delivering a history lesson and it  is made more exciting as it is about our own state of Massachusetts. This was wonderful and I would highly recommend him.

I quickly went back to the gym to see George Russell: Clap Your Hands performing for 5th grade, but I had missed most of it. Another PTO rep from Lilja was their though. What I got out of my brief moment there was that they were suing Gospel music and how it related to popular culture. There was not a religious aspect to the show, or so it seemed.

Losing steam, but vowing to see three more shows, I stayed n the gym to see Shakespeare Guyz: Avon Calling performing for 5th grade. David Zucker, the poetry man, was one of the guyz, so I had a good feeling about what I was going to see. And it was GREAT! They were Monty Python-esque and started the show with an engaging clanging of swords and buffoonery. They explained that today there are 15,000 words and phrases in our language that were created by Shakespeare such as: alligator eat me out of house and home. They explained that Thou= You and Thy = Your and Speaketh=speak and many other olden language things and what they really mean. They quoted texts as they fought and clanged and broke it down n today’s English and wow! It made Shakespeare fun, fun, fun and totally understandable. They asked the audience to think of quotes they knew from Shakespeare and got the adult audience involved too. An alarm sounded while they were speaking (something to do with the school, not their show) and they played it off without a hitch. They uncovered Shakespeare in a fun and light way and ended with a totally humorous rendition of Romeo and Juliet.

The Bambidele: African Dancers and Drummers performing for 5th grade were next. Sekou and Marilyn are good friends of mine from the Dance Complex, Portsmouth New Hampshire and other children ventures we have shared the stage for. This is a very loud and exciting show. The costumes are brightly colored and totally authentic. Marilyn wears these outfits every day! She is a luscious, smiling, warm, inviting human being. She got kids up playing instruments dancing. Almost every kid had their hand up to participate and I think a number of us adults did too. She got everyone involved by having us clap and perform arm movements in our seats. Everyone was dancing and smiling and having fun. The kids got to take a bow with the musicians before returning to heir seats. Marilyn gave a nice history speech and talked about the African and Caribbean rhythms. She used African words in her talk and had us all repeat them. This was a TOTALLY INTERACTIVE WHOLE SCHOOL GETS INVOLVED type of show. I loved it. I left wanting more.

My final show was the Tanglewood Marionettes: Perseus and Medusa performing for 2nd grade. This show was fabulous, but I may be subjective because I love love Greek Mythology! No really, this was a wonderful very professional performance. I loved that the marioneteers were above the stage and not covered up so you could see them manipulating the marionettes. This was very special and added an element of movement to the piece that I was not expecting. The scenery was VERY creative and I loved how they rolled it up as the scene went along. They used a prerecorded soundtrack for their story but that did not detract at all and when the show was over, I wanted to see it all. It had kept me so engaged and I loved it. The puppets, the story, the actors, the scenery, everything! They made the story so exciting that I believe all children would be engaged. I know I hardly even noticed the kids in the audience because they were so enrapt.


Thank you to all the performers and staff and the school the kids, everyone! It as a great day. Can’t wait till the next one! Manguito is coming to Natick to perform and I know the kids will love them-YA is an awesome organization! Thank you for bringing great art to our schools!


http://www.yamass.org/

Sunday, October 17, 2010

Young Audiences Fall 2010 Showcase Review: First 1/2 of the day

On Monday September 27th. I went to the Northeast Elementary School in Waltham, MA for the Young Audiences Fall 2010 Showcase. I was greeted cheerfully at the door and there was a name tag waiting for me along with a well organized folder with the day’s schedule of performers.

The performances were spread out from 9AM-1PM running consecutively in four different spaces within the school. Along with the varied PTO reps, professionals and other curious adults, there were lots of children from within the school enjoying the performances. It gave you a real sense of how that age group would react to each performance.

I did a lot of running between the spaces. Each performing group only had 15 minutes to showcase themselves.

I started in the gym with Made in the Shade (Jazz: From New Orleans to New York) for grade 5: There were four guys (guitar, bass, trumpet and drum kit). They played jazz mixed with soul, R & B and rock and roll. They first laid out some jazz fusion (which is a uniting of two pr more styles). For this they played the song "Cantaloop". They got the whole audience clapping and had a really nice solo guitar section. Next they played some Latin Jazz which is jazz with Latin rhythms. There was a nice drum solo and the clapping was very engaging for the audience. They even did a little silly dancing on the stage, (plus some limbo). They were very energetic and all in all a fun group.


Before they had finished, I scooted off to the cafeteria to see Opera Boston performing for 1st graders who were doing a fine and fun rendition of Little Red Riding Hood. They posed questions throughout there act and engaged the audience by asking for their help. This was VERY engaging for the first graders and had them laughing and calling out answers gleefully. The show was silly and light and made opera very accessible for all. You could see the piano playing accompanist and I thought this was very nice and up front. They had a nice set and I liked their modern take on the costumes. Little red Riding Hood. A children's opera in one act. Words and music by S. Barab. Vocal score by the composer, etc

Taking a little rest, I remained in the cafeteria to see Leland Faulkner: World of Wonder, being performed for the 1st grade. He started with a brief description of his act and explained that stories are not only in books, that stories can be told through magic. He emphasized that dreaming is the real magic. This performance was utterly magical and thoroughly engaging, I mean for the kids and all the adults in attendance. He started with a large round screen at the front of the stage and from there, with a CD player playing in the background. He did the most fun and amazing hand shadow puppets and had the audience laughing out loud, fully and everyone was engaged by his antics. At times, he would step out form the screen and pantomime and then jump right back and make more puppets. He did a cat, dog, rabbit, rooster, frog, bird, squirrel, llama, deer, a dog chasing a squirrel, a swan, spider, scary face with cool sound effects and an elephant, owl and a very animated parrot to just name a few. There were lots of screams of laughter from the audience. He talked about how to make the puppets and had everyone follow simple directions to make a dog face. He explained clearly about shadows and their relation to light. Much of his act did not need words, his imagery said it all. His show was engaging and humorous. He then started a magic section of his show, but I wanted to check out Odaiko in the gym, so I scurried off.

Now in the gym again, watching Odaiko: Taiko Thunder, performing for grade 5. I know Juni personally as my cousin Diane is involved with Odaiko, but speaking objectively, this is a great show, They had two drummers and a about 4 drums, Juni and her associate were very engaging to the audience with a whole call and response thing in the beginning. They told the story of Taiko drumming and the many uses that Taiko have been used for. As Juni spoke, the other drummer played the drum in the background adding to the pulse of the show. This style of drumming is not only about the extraordinary rhythms but also about the graceful dance like movements of the drummer. Odaiko is full of rhythmic power and graceful beauty. My eyes were riveted to the stge. This show was extremely authentic, dynamic and I was tingling at the end.I loved the rhythms; they made me want to get up and dance.

I ran to the cafeteria and caught a brief moment of Myth Masters: Tales from Greek Mythology, performing for grade 3. They were good story tellers and the show was smooth, but I did not see enough of it to get a good sense of it.

I went to classroom 117 to catch a few minutes of the Improv Boston Anti-bullying workshop for grade 4. They were pay acting a scene and making it very clear that words make a difference; that words can hurt; and that you should think about what you are going to say before you say it and make a choice about your words. They asked for an audience member to come up and join in their improv and tons of hands shot right up. This participant was to say "ding" whenever he saw something in the scene being acted out that he felt was bullying. They asked the rest of the audience to choose a setting for their scene (in drama class was chosen) and off they went. They were silly and larger than life with their getting the point across that words can hurt as much as a slap. 

Back on the run, I was in the gym again to see Deraldo Ferreira: Capoeira: Afro Brazilian Music and dace being performed for grade 3. Deraldo is also a friend of mine from the Dance Complex  Cambridge, where we both teach classes (I am a children’s tap teacher there and have taught youth to tap dance for 15 years at this location-actually Rozann Kraus, the Grand Puba, pushed me in the beginning to rent the pace and start teaching. Ole Rozann!).  Deraldo had flash cards he used that had Brazilian words on them and as he related his story he would hold up the cards and have the audience repeats the words. He gave a very good history of Capoeira, the Brazilian dance style, and on an easel, he had a large map of Brazil.  He had very authentic costumes and two dance members came out and did a traditional dance called "Maculele". It was thrilling and very interesting, even though I thought the space was a bit small for them. The costumes were great and then Deraldo played the drum and sang while they danced. The dancers were very exciting, and they even did some really cool flips. The show was flashy in an authentic way and the kids were thoroughly entranced. 

I arrived at 9AM and I am only at 10:25 right now. More to come as I saw 7 more shows!

Thursday, October 14, 2010

Yeah we are listed in the Bosotn Globe's "G" Dance Picks!

http://www.boston.com/ae/theater_arts/articles/2010/10/14/arts_the_week_ahead/?page=2

Thank you Karen Campbell!
TWO NIGHTS IN SPAIN This mini-festival of Spanish culture features flamenco dancers Eva Lorca and Yvonne Lalyre in two programs of music, dance, poetry, and drama. ‘‘A Poet’s Life: Lorca in Words and Music’’ (Oct. 15) honors the legendary Federico Garcia Lorca. ‘‘Romantic Spain: Albeniz, Falla, Granados’’ (Oct. 16) celebrates three of Spain’s greatest nationalist composers. $10-$25. Blacksmith House, Cambridge. 617-666-7973, www.alwaysbdancing.blogspot.com